DONNA ASIMAKOS, Georgia

Q: Do you have a farm, homestead?
A: We have a 6 acre retirement homestead in a mixed rural/urban area.  We have a few goats, a small herd of sheep, chickens and turkeys.

Q: How many Gamprs do you own and what are their names?
A: We have two Gamprs. Our male is named Ari and our female is Ida.

Q: Did your dog come from a breeder in the US/CA or did you import?
A: Ari was an import from Armenia and Ida came from a breeder in the US.

Q: Do you, or did you, have a breed mentor? Tell us about that. 
A: Our breeder is our mentor and has given selflessly of her time to help us through the processes of importing and learning to be a Gampr owner.   We depend on her heavily for advice and guidance.

Q: What made you choose this breed?
A: We researched LGDs online for a long time before we moved forward, and we settled on the Gampr based on what we read and saw.

Q: Can you tell us a bit about your dogs?
A: Ari is 18 months old.  He is the sweetest, easiest fellow.  He lives full time outside (we kept him with us inside for the first month or two).  He’s still somewhat of a teenager. He’s fine and trusted with the full grown sheep and goats but he still has some trouble resisting running after baby sheep.   He’s still learning and gets better all the time.  He is very well behaved in the sheep barn when all the mamas and babies are together but being only 18 months still requires supervision and can’t be left alone.   He’s showing more respect and calmness around the sheep every day - it’s easy to see he’s maturing into a very good dog.   Ida is our 8 month old female.  She is happy and delightful.  She’s full of puppy energy when she’s playing, but spends a good deal of the day resting like most Gamprs.   

Q: What job(s) does your Gampr(s) have?
A: Ari and Ida guard the entire perimeter at night when the animals are in their respective pens.  In the morning they get to do chores with us, but not together.   During the day they are in a large section of the farm with the adult goats and a ram but are not yet allowed to free range with the poultry and sheep during the day.   

Q: How is your Gampr with children?
A: Our Gamprs are very good with children.

Q: How is your Gampr with other animals? 
A: Our Gamprs are very good with our farm animals.   They still think poultry are for chasing but we are working on that.   They like to look at my husband’s canaries in cages.    They have no tolerance for strange animals coming around.    Ari managed to chase a small neighbor dog off the property without hurting it which made me very happy.  After rolling it four or five times that dog had no desire to stay.   If the dog had remained it would have met a different end. 

Q: What is your Gampr activity level?
A: They are most active during typical predator hours overnight and from 4-8 am.   They sleep a lot during the day. 

Q: Do you have any issues with picky food issues, grooming, health problems or vetting concerns?
A: My Gamprs are very healthy and hardy.  It took us a while to figure out exactly what to feed them but we have it down to what seems to be a good system for them.

Q: What do you feed your dog(s)?
A: We feed our Gamprs large breed dog feed twice a day, a quarter chicken every 1-2 days, raw frozen beef marrow bones most days (especially if they need distracting), scrambled eggs once or twice a week, and yogurt weekly.  I often use bone broth to soften their dog food. They love that.   About twice a month they get fish or canned tuna or sardines.   All of these foods seem to keep their systems happy.   

Q: How would you rate your Gampr? From extremely laid back (level 1) to very intense (level 10)
A: I would rate Ari a 2 and Ida a 3.

Q: How does your Gampr react to unexpected strangers?
A: They alert very loudly to unexpected strangers which is a huge help to us.

Q: How does your Gampr react to guests you greet and allow on your property?
A: They alert bark for a short time but stop when they see that I am ok and I tell them “thank you, it’s ok, we are ok.”

Q: What is a typical day for your Gampr?
A: In the morning while they have access to the whole field, they do rounds on their own and check on animals in pens and lay around. Then they come along while everyone gets fed. We play and train for a while.   They get fed but they don’t always want to eat in the morning.   They are then penned into about one acre with the billy, ram and adult female goats or in another area.   In the late afternoon they get raw chicken.   They do evening chores with us and come with while we feed and pen everyone (poultry barn, sheep barn).  Anytime we are interacting we are also training.  Then they are free and run around checking the whole property with or without us.  They have dinner after dark. Then they patrol on and off all night long.

Q: What is your favorite trait, ability or feature about Gamprs?
A: Our Gamprs alert us and the animals to all potential threats including flying threats.  We haven’t ever lost a bird to a hawk under the Gamprs’ watch. 

Q: If you could give someone advice who may be on the fence of choosing a breed, what would you tell them?
A: If you want a loving pet you trust as well as a terrific livestock guardian, the Gampr is for you.

Q: What kind of advice would you give to a new Gampr puppy owner?
A: Be patient, your puppy needs to bond first and then livestock duty training needs to be paced as your dog matures.   Even if it seems your pup is comfortable with the livestock, he needs to acquire maturity before you can trust him.    Walk the perimeter with him over and over.  I learned not to walk them around outside the fenced area (other than directly to and from the main house) because then they think they must guard that area too.   I think it’s very confusing.   For instance, to and from the mailbox.  They’re so smart, and they want to add that route to their nightly rounds, but it’s outside the perimeter fencing.    I find it is better to just not do it.   Taking them offsite in a car is ok.

Q: Why did you join the AGCA?

A: To buy a pup and get support

 

 
 

SUSAN BOWERS, Ohio

Q: Do you have a farm, homestead, or line in a rural setting? Tell us your set up.

A: We own acreage in two other states, and plan to move & have stock eventually...but for now we are still in town. They patrol the yard a couple times a day, sleep inside at night, and are indoor/outdoor dogs in general. Both are crate trained and also trained to load up in their “off duty” 20' kennels if needed.

 

Q: How many Gamprs do you own and what are their names?

A: Two. Omage and Bison.

 

Q: Did your dog come from a breeder in the US/CA or did you import?

A: Imported (both)

 

Q: Do you, or did you, have a breed mentor? Tell us about that

A: Not really, aside from picking Heather's brain a lot!

 

Q: What made you choose this breed?

A: I wanted something naturally protective of me, the yard, and our other animals—with the inborn instinct, not something “sharp” that received formal training...and I wanted low prey drive to protect our cats as well.

 

Q: Can you tell us a bit about your dogs?

A: Both of them are extremely good boys. They adore us, they are super cuddly (we call them into the bed every day for “Baby Time!” and they lay with us and soak up love), they hardly ever do anything wrong. Both are so attentive to us; if we get injured or even are sad, they will lick and nuzzle us and keep an eye on us.

 

Q: What job(s) does your Gampr(s) have?

A: Property patrol, learning obedience commands. They have a stellar recall!

 

Q: How is your Gampr with children?

A: They've seen very few, but they are NOT keen on them. Bison in particular does not like them.

 

Q: How is your Gampr with other animals?

A: Amazing, with the ones they know. Fierce towards trespassers! The only glitch is that they don't like one of the pet dogs. They tolerate him, but he's a socially obnoxious doofus and that offends them.  I have to separate when unattended.

 

Q: What is your Gampr activity level?

A: Deliciously lazy. They lay around giving cuddles all day, unless something “activates” them into guard dog mode!

 

Q: Do you have any issues with picky food issues, grooming, health problems or vetting concerns?

A: I'm not looking forward to vetting them  :-/  They are not people friendly. No problem at all acclimating them to any & all handling by us. I trim nails, brush them often, inspect them for any potential health dings, and they are just happy to be touched. (Nail snipping took a few times before they stopped trying to slide their foot away, hahaha.) They ate VERY enthusiastically for the first several months. Now they're more picky, but they have good judgment.

 

Q: What do you feed your dog(s)? 

A: Raw meat. A wide variety of meats, bones and organs. Occasionally supplemented with wet or dry dog food, which they usually snub.

 

Q:  How would you rate your Gampr? From extremely laid back (level 1) to very intense (level 10)

A: Bison is very intense when he “activates”, probably a 9. Far more than most dogs I've worked with. It's taken some effort to get a response from him when he sees something that concerns him. Omage is more laid back, maybe a 6 or 7.

 

Q: How does your Gampr react to unexpected strangers?

A: All the hair goes up and they bark ferociously, foaming at the mouth, until 1) stranger leaves  or 2)their humans intervene. Omage will stop almost as soon as I say “okay, I see them”. Bison is almost to that point now, after a lot more work, although some people/animals REALLY set him off and he'll bark until I get my hands on him and step in between. If someone is standing in our actual yard, both of them will bark for an extended period, regardless of my interference; they only stop if my guy yells “ENOUGH.” In a big voice. They are more protective of me; my guy is a big dude and I guess they figure, if he says so, he's got this. (!)  Neither of them has EVER  redirected on us, no matter how furious they are, though.

 

Q: How does your Gampr react to guests you greet and allow on your property?

A: Unfortunately about the same as above, although they're finally starting to understand the concept. I had a friend over today for the first time; Omage got to the fence before me and barked a couple times, until I arrived and told him Ok and greeted her, then he was fine. Bison was in his crate, and grumbled once when she came into the room and looked at him, and then growled once when she petted “his” cat. That's pretty good for him! In all fairness to the dogs, we got them at 5mos old and we have very few visitors & barely any social life.  We've had pet sitters twice – two different couples – and they are not having any of that. They don't care who feeds them, they can't be bought.

 

Q: What is a typical day for your Gampr?

A: They wake up (each one has chosen one of the 2 doors to sleep in front of <3 ), greet us when we get up, go to the back door and Sit/Wait to go out to the smaller yard & potty. I feed the cats, get dressed, and go out with them: I say “Wanna Go Patrol?” and let them into the main yard, and they make the rounds, checking all the fencelines & checking on their “dog stock” (my dingo dogs). I walk around a bit with them, then go in & make their breakfasts. After a bit, they come back in & eat, & I feed the other dogs separately outside. When we leave for work, they usually want back out, although if one doesn't, I leave them inside to guard the house until I come home for lunch. At lunch, they get “break time” (Bison works too hard, trying to watch everything from the smaller yard and yelling at anyone suspicious...I've found that if he doesn't take a break midday, he tends to get a bit strung out by the end of the day.) When I go back to work, I offer them back out to their smaller yard. I don't give them free rein while I'm gone bc I don't trust some weirdo not to mess with them at the fencelines. Plus I don't want them to bully the big dumb “pet dog”. When I get home, they go back on patrol. Then we hang out, then dinner, then bed. Maybe we go for a walk, or tether them to the front porch and sit out there for a while. Sometimes we grill, and they keep us company and their food gets lightly  grilled too.  ;-)  Weekends, there's more in & out, more training, more petting and having them “help us” do stuff. We'll be taking them out to the land every other weekend soon too.   

 

Q: What is your favorite trait, ability or feature about Gamprs?

A: SO loving and calm and well behaved...but still capable of keeping me safe. They are perfect until they need to be fierce. I guess they are the proverbial “warrior in a garden”.

 

Q: Can you tell us an interesting story about your Gampr?

A: Here's a story about both gamprs together. When they were still under a year, I read something about cuttlefish passing “the marshmallow test” - delaying gratification for a better reward later. I made a dog version by asking them to “pick a hand”...with both hands having a treat, but one being tastier than the other. Once they choose a treat, BOTH hands go away. Then we showed one hand, with a lower value treat, to see if they would hold out for the better one instead of taking the immediately available one. Both of them learned to pass the test almost immediately! (Hmmm, now maybe I know why they snub the dog food. hahaha)

 

Q: If you could give someone advice who may be on the fence of choosing a breed, what would you tell them?

A: If you want a genuinely *kind* dog, who is normally relaxed and easygoing, but will still rally to protect you & yours when needed without any special training, this one fits the bill.

 

Q: What kind of advice would you give to a new Gampr puppy owner?

A: Build that bond, show good leadership (so they respect your input), and be very consistent with training so they can be their best self.

 

Q: Why did you join the AGCA? 

A: It felt like the right thing to do, since I had just imported two boys and want to be a part of conserving the breed...

JOY HILL, Michigan

Q: Do you have a farm, homestead?

A: We have a 5 acre farm in SW Michigan, running a small herd of Icelandics and Pastured hogs.

 

Q: How many Gamprs do you own and what are their names? 

A: We have two Gamprs currently… Panda & Bari

 

Q: Did your dog come from a breeder in the US/CA or did you import?

A: Panda was born in the U.S. & Bari is an import from Armenia

 

Q: Do you, or did you, have a breed mentor? Tell us about that

A: I’d say my greatest breed mentors have been Heather & Rhonda. They’ve both been so helpful in learning the ropes of owning a Gampr & raising them to be the best dogs they can be.

 

Q: What made you choose this breed? 

A: I needed an LGD but was turned off by some of the mindset of other breeders and how they trained their dogs. I was also highly concerned with the genetic health of all these dogs. The Gampr being so fresh off the boat seemed the best bet for both the health & temperament I was looking for.

 

Q: Can you tell us a bit about your dogs? 

A: Panda  just turned 3. He’s the best, totally chill boy who takes his job and responsibilities very seriously. Head ranch hand around these parts. Bari is 2 and an absolute goob. She’s a silly little chatter box who adores people. But let a hawk or buzzard come by and she hits speeds to rival a fighter jet.

 

Q: What job(s) does your Gampr(s) have? 

A: They’re primarily in charge of our herd of sheep but are being introduced to our pigs also. They watch over the free range poultry & cats too. Panda in particular has a penchant for his little feline friends. Deer deterrent for my tulips is a bonus.

 

Q: How is your Gampr with children? 

A: They both adore children. But Panda is definitely more mindful and indulgent of the little ones.

 

Q: How is your Gampr with other animals? 

A: They both do well with direction. Bari is probably the most suspicious of strange canines but is besties with our 14yr old senile GSD. Panda needs to be boss dog no questions asked, and is a little spooky around horses. Which I’d like to work on with him.

 

Q: What is your Gampr activity level? 

A; They have free run of our 70x100 pasture blocks which they are rotated through with the sheep. They come along with us for hikes around the property or trips into town. I’d say overall they are hard workers with high endurance but when given the chance they’d spend more than half the day lounging and sleeping.

 

Q: Do you have any issues with picky food issues, grooming, health problems or vetting concerns?

A: Neither dog is a food hound but have no trouble getting them to eat their meals. Grooming is a piece of cake and their fur seems to repel just about everything. Caveat being Bari who will find the stinkiest thing to roll in and somehow it stays for weeks. Bari also seems to have some issues with her teeth & mouth health as far as plaque/bad breathe and possibly cavities. Our vet wants to do a deep clean while she’s down for her hip X-rays (basic health testing).

 

Q: What do you feed your dog(s)?

A: Currently they’re on Sportmix brand… but we’ve fed everything from Acana to Diamond. 

 

Q: How would you rate your Gampr? From extremely laid back (level 1) to very intense (level 10) 

Panda- 1 or 2 he’s just a very solid intimidating presence. Bari- 7 some days she’s a loooot, loves to be in your bubble too

 

Q: How does your Gampr react to unexpected strangers? 

A: Both alert to strange people/cars

 

Q: How does your Gampr react to guests you greet and allow on your property?

A: They’re very keen on getting all the pets

Q: What is a typical day for your Gampr? 

A: Mornings I’ll have coffee with them in the barn or up at the house. Then they get swapped to a new pasture, & water check. We are usually out working somewhere on the farm through the day. Sometimes we’ll hike together or go into town. Evening all the animals get fed and checked over. Gamprs get a romp away from their charges either in the barn or in an open pasture. Occasionally or during lambing they’ll see us multiple times through the night for check ins.

 

Q: What is your favorite trait, ability or feature about Gamprs?

A: I love how intelligent they are. They totally know what I’m saying…. Also ALL the colors! 

 

Q: Can you tell us an interesting story about your Gampr? 

A: When Panda was younger and still learning things we had another dog who was horrid about getting in the trash. We got on him constantly about messing with trash and even had a slide out cabinet installed in our kitchen for it. We’ll apparently Panda was paying attention because he would “tattle” and bark anytime the other dog got too nosy with the trash or trash drawer.

 

Q: If you could give someone advice who may be on the fence of choosing a breed, what would you tell them? 

A: I would tell them to find a breeder or mentor who aligns with what they want and go from there. The “old” ways of raising LGDs are few and far between so if someone is doing that then they will be indispensable.

 

Q: What kind of advice would you give to a new Gampr puppy owner?

A: They are smarter than you know… they may use it for good. But they can also be extra naughty

 

Q: Why did you join the AGCA?

A: I got a puppy who I wanted to register for breed support & for if we decided to breed our dogs. I stayed with the AGCA because I believe in the awesome work they’re doing for these dogs and the supportive community they’re fostering.

 

GARY HOWARD, Mississippi

Q: Do you have a farm, homestead?

A: We live in a fairly rural setting with a few cows, goats, and chickens. Their main purpose is to eat the pasture so I don’t have to cut it. Our home and barn sit on six acres with 3-4 acres fenced in for the animals. Surrounding us are ag fields and large landowners.

 

Q: How many Gamprs do you own and what are their names?

A: Currently have one male, Razmik.

 

Q: Did your dog come from a breeder in the US/CA or did you import?

A: He came from a breeder in the US.

 

Q: Do you, or did you, have a breed mentor?

A: We are fortunate that our breed mentor is also the breeder that we got Razmik from, who is also the current President of the AGCA. She is always very helpful in any questions we have and provides guidance along the way on top of the many things she does for the AGCA.

 

Q: What made you choose this breed?

A: I had been curious about getting a large breed Livestock/Farm dog for a while since moving out to the country. I can't remember what I researched first but Razmik’s breeder at the time was selling custom furniture. When we drove to pick up the table we purchased I saw the Gamprs in person for the first time. This prompted me to research more into the breed. I liked their disposition and how they’re relatively free of major health issues. I know most if not all LGDs can handle the extreme heat and humidity we have in the South, but the shorter coat of the gampr compared to a GP was another selling point to me.

 

Q: Can you tell us a bit about your dogs?

A: Razmik is a little over a year old. A BIG clown. He loves his people and loves to play. Sometimes I wish he did a little less play but he is still a puppy so it's understandable.

 

Q: What job(s) does your Gampr(s) have?

A: His job is to live and protect his goats and cows (mainly goats) from the sneaky coyotes or stray dogs that sometimes prowl the area. He will bark at “suspicious” vehicles and people (meter men). If I'm having a bad day, he is also a good soft pillow to hug on and give comic relief when he looks at you with his lazy eyes.

 

Q: How is your Gampr with children?

A: Razmik has only had one encounter with middle-school aged children and he did fine. Just sniffed and begged to be petted and hugged.

 

Q: How is your Gampr with other animals?

A: Razmik does well with his goats and cows. He can be found most days asleep with the goats walking around him or asleep up against his cows as they block the wind for him. Razmik does very well walking on a leash as he meets other dogs in public. He only has an issue when the dogs are on his property, particularly intact males. I would consider him to be very aggressive towards them. For this reason, Razmik stays with his stock and doesn’t have free reign on the entire property unsupervised.  

 

Q: What is your Gampr activity level?

A: This is very dependent on the season, time of day, and predator activity in the area. In the cooler months he will take short day naps and walk around with the stock, moving when they move. Warmer months you can guarantee he will be under a shade tree for most of the day. Night-time he is all business. He is constantly moving as we can hear his barks from different areas of the pasture. He's constantly running the perimeter. When the sun comes up he’s exhausted. Compared to our inside dogs I'd say he is very active.

 

Q: Do you have any issues with picky food issues, grooming, health problems or vetting concerns?

A: The only issue he has had is a brief bout panosteitis (growing pains). This only lasted a week and after some anti-inflammatory meds he was back to his usual self.

 

Q: What do you feed your dog(s)? 

A: I feed a brand found at our local co-op; Extreme Dog Fuel, specifically the 30-20 and the 26-18. I first used it with my senior dog and noticed such a dramatic change in her skin and overall physique I’ve been feeding it to all my dogs ever since. I like that it's produced in the USA with locally sourced ingredients, it has a 5 star rating on DogFoodAdvisor, and at $32 per 40lb bag it can't be beat. Occasionally Razmik will get a splash of olive oil and some eggs added in during the winter or if I notice he’s been more active than usual. With this diet paired with his activity level he maintains a fairly lean, athletic physique.

 

Q: How would you rate your Gampr? From extremely laid back (level 1) to very intense (level 10)

His personality changes through the day. Early AM and at sunset he’s an 8. Midday he’s a 2. During those early and late hours, he can be highly reactive. A stick breaks in the woods he sprints to go check it out and bark at it. A vulture or goose flies overhead, he immediately barks and chases them away. Midday, especially in the summer, if he’s asleep and the livestock aren't making any distress sounds, he could care less about the outside world. This is perfectly fine with me as the main predator threat occurs at night.

 

Q: How does your Gampr react to unexpected strangers?

A: He is very good at reading a situation. If someone is trying to be quiet and moving slow (neighbors hunting or a meter man) or a vehicle is unfamiliar with him he gets upset and barks. The mail-lady and UPS drivers always get a pass. We live at the end of a dead-end gravel road so we don’t get much if any passers-by.

 

Q: How does your Gampr react to guests you greet and allow on your property?

A: If I am present and he gets to see me with the guest he treats them like family. No questions. They get all the sniffs and licks they can stand.

 

Q: What is a typical day for your Gampr?

A: Now that it is getting warmer out his day is a lot like mine since I work night-shift.  Mornings are slow I go out and feed him and sit with him a while. After about 9am he goes and lays under a tree or the lean-to occasionally getting up to look at his stock then returning back to sleep. At 5-6pm I feed him his dinner and he is just starting to wake up and move around. After he finishes his dinner he will slowly walk around or lay down until dusk. Once the sun has set and light has faded his energy levels go up and he starts his night shift. This includes running the perimeter, sounding off at the coyotes as they howl, and barking at random things in the night. He usually starts to wind down his shift around 5am. By then he goes to his dog house and takes a short nap until breakfast.

 

Q: What is your favorite trait, ability or feature about Gamprs?

A: I like how they are equally at home in cold weather as they are in hot weather. Very adaptable.

 

Q: Can you tell us an interesting story about your Gampr?

A: Razmik does some silly things from time to time but one time I looked out the window to find him getting milk from one of our cows. She stayed calm and let him continue as her calf was doing the same. Razmik loves his cows.

 

Q: If you could give someone advice who may be on the fence of choosing a breed, what would you tell them?

A: If they have already narrowed it down to a few breeds based on aesthetics, history, and health characteristics, I would then start looking at the breeder of the particular dog or dogs you intended to get. Ask questions like how are they raised, are the parents currently working, is this a puppy mill, are the parents health tested, how long can their lineage be traced, is breeding dogs this person's sole income? If they're able to find a top quality breeder within reasonable reach I would choose that puppy/dog. Price of the puppy/dog should be fairly low on the list. While it is an important factor and there is nothing a $1000 dog can do that a $100 dog cant do. Yes, in my area GPs and GP/AS mixes go for that and less. But the difference between the two can be as little as one Vet visit. Do the homework up front on the breeder and it will save you time, money, and stress on the back-end.

 

Q: What kind of advice would you give to a new Gampr puppy owner?

A: Be patient but firm. They feed off of you so it’s important to show confidence when they see you. Give them your time. They will only be as good as the amount of time and effort you put into them so give them the most you can.

 

Q: Why did you join the AGCA? 

A: It is an important organization that not only intends to preserve the breed but also provide guidance to owners and provide information to the general public about the breed. Gamprs are not only being threatened in their native lands through poor breeding practices and misuse of dogs for fighting, but even here in the US the same issues are arising. The AGCA provides that standardization and guidance of proper breeding practices. The combination of quality breeders and responsible and educated owners is a main focus of the AGCA and a big reason why I chose to join and show my support. Without the AGCA’s intervention I'm afraid the breed as we know and love would fade away.

 

ANDREA KASPER, Minnesota

Q: Do you have a farm, homestead,?

A: We Farm/Homestead on 150 acres. That includes pasture land as well.

 

Q: How many Gamprs do you own and what are their names?

A: We currently have a breeding pair of Gamprs. Mack and Remy are their names.

 

Q: Did your dog come from a breeder in the US/CA or did you import?

A: Both came from a breeder in the US 

 

Q: Do you, or did you, have a breed mentor? Tell us about that

A: Our breeder was very welcoming with all the questions we had regarding this breed and what we were looking for in dogs that would fit our life and farm.

 

Q: What made you choose this breed?

A: We specialize in heritage breed animals on this farm, so the Gampr was a perfect fit all around for us especially since they are a very rare and critical breed.

 

Q: Can you tell us a bit about your dogs? The male Mack is huge! He’s more of the presence vs the bark. When he does bark, then you know he means business. The female Remy is our fearless snow queen. Smaller then Mack but she definitely the barker of the 2. She always has a smile on her face! Both are unbelievable dogs in so many ways. We are very grateful to have them in our lives…and yes even all the other animals agree with that!

 

Q: What job(s) does your Gampr(s) have?

A: They both keep prowl the pastures several times through the 24 hour day, as well as keep the front step weighed down during naps!

 

Q: How is your Gampr with children?

A: With our kiddo they are great! Since Mack is a beast of a dog, most kids are scared so we simply lock them up when we have kids over.

 

Q: How is your Gampr with other animals?

A: Our farm cats get chased quite a bit. Our chickens and fowl have their own 3 acre piece fenced in with their own guard dog, so the Gamprs haven’t had to interact with them .

 

Q: What is your Gampr activity level?

A: They mostly roam all night and sleep most days.

 

Q: Do you have any issues with picky food issues, grooming, health problems or vetting concerns?

A: None

 

Q: What do you feed your dog(s)?

A: They get a combination of kibble and a raw diet

 

Q: How would you rate your Gampr? From extremely laid back (level 1) to very intense (level 10)

A: Remy would be a 1, Mack would be maybe a 2 Both are very very laid back when not on duty or if we are in the yard doing work or playing.

 

Q: How does your Gampr react to unexpected strangers?

A: Bark and stand at attention

 

Q: How does your Gampr react to guests you greet and allow on your property?

A: We give them a command that lets them know they can let their guards down when it is someone we know.

 

Q: What is a typical day for your Gampr?

A: 6 am breakfast and fresh water, sleep most the day, 6 pm supper and fresh water, then roam the property most the night

 

Q: What is your favorite trait, ability or feature about Gamprs?

A: Their looks alone get some to question whether or not to get out of the car. They are surprisingly very loving and affectionate dogs!

 

Q: Can you tell us an interesting story about your Gampr?

A: Our Gamprs will want love and attention all day we are with them, then at night are so focused that they have killed several species of predators that try to get our livestock. Including several skunks….PU!

 

Q: If you could give someone advice who may be on the fence of choosing a breed, what would you tell them?

A: They are great dogs, but can be very intense since they are so closely related directly from wolves. We have to feed our dogs in kennels separate from each other or they attack one another out of jealousy. We had to work hard to get Mack to respect us and to learn that we are the bosses.

 

Q: What kind of advice would you give to a new Gampr puppy owner?

A: Don’t let them boss you around.

 

Q: Why did you join the AGCA?

A: We plan to breed our Gamprs and thought it would help give us good credit.

 

DOUG MARGASON, Florida

Q: Do you have a farm, homestead?

A: We have 5 acres where we just started a small hobby farm.

 

Q: How many Gamprs do you own and what are their names?

A: We own Tribble Hill Farm’s Raffi

 

Q: Did your dog come from a breeder in the US/CA or did you import?

A: US Breeder from Armenian imports

 

Q: Do you, or did you, have a breed mentor? Tell us about that

A: It was important to me to establish a mentor prior to owning a Gampr.  I had several questions about whether Gamprs were the right breed for us.  Getting connected with Heather was integral for us getting involved with the breed.  Her support has been outstanding!

 

Q: What made you choose this breed?

A: We wanted a dog that would bond to us more than to the livestock.  A dog that wanted to please us as the owners versus thinking he was part of a flock.  We have two small Japanese Chins and it was important for us to have a LGD that was gentle with other dogs.  

 

Q: Can you tell us a bit about your dogs?

A: Raffi is the sweetest dog full of intelligence and enthusiasm.  He is such a joy to work with.

 

Q: What job(s) does your Gampr(s) have?

We are hoping he will primarily guard our Nigerian Dwarf goats.  He is still young and being trained.

 

Q: How is your Gampr with children?

A: He isn’t aggressive with children, but he is still rough.  We are working on keeping him from jumping out of excitement.

 

Q: How is your Gampr with other animals?

A: He has been great around all the animals.  He does better with the bigger ones (i.e. mini donkey).  He’s so big and plays so rough that he runs over the little dogs sometimes so we have to be careful.

 

Q: What is your Gampr activity level?

A: Raffi is very active.  I find that keeping him well-fed and tired is the best way to keep him from getting into trouble.  Many nights we walk the perimeter of the property to get him to settle down for bedtime.

 

Q: Do you have any issues with picky food issues, grooming, health problems or vetting concerns?

A: No problems noted so far.  Months 3-6 seemed to present some problems with his legs hurting while developing as the muscles caught up with the bone/joint growth.  He seems fine now.

 

What do you feed your dog(s)?

Pro Plan Large Breed Kibble 2-3x per day.  1/3 of a can of Pedigree and some low sodium bone broth with the kibble every morning for some added flavor.

 

Q: How would you rate your Gampr? From extremely laid back (level 1) to very intense (level 10)

A: I’d say 3-4 as a puppy.  I’d imagine 1-2 as he matures.

 

Q: How does your Gampr react to unexpected strangers?

A: No real experience with that.  He loves meeting people at Rural King.

 

Q: How does your Gampr react to guests you greet and allow on your property?

A: He is very excited to great them and quickly flops over for a belly rub!

 

Q: What is a typical day for your Gampr?

A: He’s been outside 24/7 since 7 months old.  He usually lays on the porch, sidewalk, or driveway looking over the whole front yard (3+ wooded acres).  He loves to chew his bone whenever he isn’t sleeping.  If he sees or hears a strange sound he’ll investigate while barking at a distance.  He always follows us around the yard anytime we’re outside.  Many times, he’ll lay across a gate until we come in or out.  We play fetch with his ball about everyday and take him on walks with the mini donkey a few times per week.  He loves going for rides in the Jeep!

 

Q: What is your favorite trait, ability or feature about Gamprs?

A: I only have direct experience with Raffi, but he just seems to “get it.”  It’s almost like he can ready my mind and anticipate my next move; sometimes before I even know what it is.

 

Q: Can you tell us an interesting story about your Gampr?

A: We had Raffi in the backyard with us while working on a barn.  He was just 3 months old.  We heard a noise coming from the house and he immediately jumped up, charged the house, and was barking with the most intimidating bark.  I was shocked that a 3-month-old puppy would be that protective and have the instinct and courage to address the situation like that.

 

Q: If you could give someone advice who may be on the fence of choosing a breed, what would you tell them?

A: It a huge commitment and you’re going to fall in love.  It’s a lot of work and not for the faint of heart.  If you’re worried about transitioning from having pet dogs to a working Gampr there is no need to fear.  They have plenty of love and attention to still be pet-like while being independent enough to entertain themselves outside.

 

Q: What kind of advice would you give to a new Gampr puppy owner?

A: Treat your puppy like a puppy and remember they are still young.  They get huge quick and it’s easy to forget how immature they are.  Don’t expect them to act grown just because they look grown.  Pigs ears and buffalo horns work great!  Ours hated to be crated so you need a safe place for them while you’re away.  We found a lot of comfort in getting a Fi collar early on to make sure he was still in the yard when we weren’t home.

 

Q: Why did you join the AGCA?

A: I wanted to support the club and I wanted the club to support me.  I think the effort of keeping these dogs pure and available is worth the effort.  They are so great!  And the club has been excellent too!

 

Gabriela Ruano, New Mexico

Q: Do you have a farm, homestead?

A: I have a 5 acre property on the outskirts of Santa Fe, NM. I live up a dirt road and many people around this area have livestock and dogs of their own.

 

Q: How many Gamprs do you own and what are their names?

A: I have one Gampr named Escanor.

 

Q: Did your dog come from a breeder in the US/CA or did you import?

A: My Gampr came from Tribble Hill Farm Gamprs.

 

Q: Do you, or did you, have a breed mentor? Tell us about that

A: When I have questions, I refer back to the breeder as well as my aunt, Rohana Mayer. They provide me with any answers and resources necessary.

 

Q: What made you choose this breed?

A: I love the history, temperament and independence of these dogs as well as their ability to bond and care for their family.

 

Q: Can you tell us a bit about your dogs?

A: Escanor is unusually social and loves spending time with all people and animals. He is a little over a year old and growing into himself nicely. He is goofy and loving and insists on getting much of the attention and affection in the household.

 

Q: What job(s) does your Gampr(s) have?

A: We do not have livestock but we do have a cat and lots of predators around the property. Escanor patrols at dawn and sundown and keeps the predators away and the cat safe. He alerts to any unwelcome animal coming onto the property.

 

Q: How is your Gampr with children?

A: He adores children though is still young and can occasionally get a little too excited around them.

 

Q: How is your Gampr with other animals?

A: My Gampr loves just about any animals that he has been introduced to. He has only been slightly territorial around other male dogs that he does not know who have come on the property.

 

Q: What is your Gampr activity level?

A: My Gampr is active in the mornings and evenings and we often go for walks in the mountains or in town. He sleeps most of the afternoon and the wakes around 4-5PM to patrol the property or go for walks.

 

Q: Do you have any issues with picky food issues, grooming, health problems or vetting concerns?

A: No issues other than he has been spoiled with meat and other food being added to his kibble. Because of this, he doesn’t like kibble on its own much.

 

Q: What do you feed your dog(s)?

A: I feed him a large breed dog food and add things such as meat, carrots, apples, fish, yogurt and eggs to it.

 

Q: How would you rate your Gampr? From extremely laid back (level 1) to very intense (level 10)

A: I would say he is a 4. Pretty laid back but can get anxious on long car rides with traffic and when he is not able to patrol the property when he thinks he must.

 

Q: How does your Gampr react to unexpected strangers?

A: He loves all people. He will alert when someone arrives but will allow anyone in to come say hello. He has made friends with all the delivery drivers in our route.

 

Q: How does your Gampr react to guests you greet and allow on your property?

A: He gets excited for new people who arrive but allows everyone onto the property. He loves people and has never shown any guarding when it comes to humans or guests coming to visit. He is unusually social for a LGD.

 

Q: What is a typical day for your Gampr?

A: He goes outside to patrol the property around 4-6AM. Around 11 he gets sleepy and will come in and go out periodically while napping until around 4 PM. This sleepy time is when we work on a lot of training and occasionally go to visit the neighbors goats. In the evenings, he gets some energy and often plays with the neighbors dog who comes over. We will often go for walks in the neighborhood and sometimes elsewhere. Around 10-12 he will be brought in to sleep in the room with my husband and myself.

 

Q: What is your favorite trait, ability or feature about Gamprs?

A: My favorite trait is his loving nature and his bond with us as his family.

 

Q: Can you tell us an interesting story about your Gampr?

A: Unusual for an LGD, he has befriended the delivery drivers on our route. There is one that he loves to see and brings him treats. When he drops off packages, he comes in and plays tug-of-war with Escanor for a few minutes before leaving for work again. It was very unexpected to see this happening but adorable and heartwarming since we do not necessarily need a very serious guard dog at this time, though, would be fine if he were that also.

 

Q: If you could give someone advice who may be on the fence of choosing a breed, what would you tell them?

A: Research. Look into the breed and ask questions. Join the training group. Gamprs mature much more slowly that normal sized dogs do and need a lot more consistency and guidance. They are an incredible dog but must have the right owner to do them justice.

 

Q: What kind of advice would you give to a new Gampr puppy owner?

A: Consistency and patience is key. They learn quickly but can be obstinate. Keep your puppy with you as much as possible throughout the daily chores and activities so that they bond deeply with you.

 

Q: Why did you join the AGCA?

A: It’s a wonderful organization that provides information, history, and support for Gampr owners. I love to support the AGCA and love what it stands for.

 

Shelby Schaeffer, Ohio

Q: Do you have a farm, homestead?

A: We live on 60 acre farm in rural Ohio. We run about 200 head of sheep and 30 head of cattle.

 

Q: How many Gamprs do you own and what are their names?

A: We own two. Our male is Chief and our female is Jemma.

 

Q: Did your dog come from a breeder in the US/CA or did you import?

A: Both of our pups were from breeders within the US.

 

Q: Do you, or did you, have a breed mentor? Tell us about that

A: Both of our pups’ breeders have been an excellent resource! We love keeping them updated on the dogs and know that they will always be there with any questions/ concerns that I have.

Q: What made you choose this breed?

A: I actually accidentally stumbled upon this breed. We’ve always used pyrs as our LGDs and when it was time to add another LGD I wanted something that would be a better fit for a “family setting”. A couple google searches later and I found multiple articles praising Gamprs for how well they do in that type of setting and started focusing my research on this specific breed. I got in contact with Heather when I knew this was the breed we wanted to move forward with and the rest is history.

 

Q: Can you tell us a bit about your dogs?

A: Chief and Jemma are both just over a year old. Jemma takes care of our yearling and ewe lambs and is incredibly attentive to them. She’s so so smart and takes her job very seriously. She is great with the family as well— gentle with the younger kids and eager to greet you at the gate. Chief is a total ham. This guy has more personality in a single toenail than any other critter on the farm. He’s still in his “teenager phase” and has the tendency to get a little excited with the stock but is quick to quiet down with correction. He keeps track of our rams and mature ewes. He is a phenomenal dog and we’re excited to see him mature. Both dogs are wary of strangers, but once we introduce them they pay no attention to visitors.

Q: What job(s) does your Gampr(s) have?

A: Due to the weather, our sheep are primarily indoors, but once the pastures dry 80% of their time will be spent on pasture. Therefore, activity level is currently low-mild but will increase as summer approaches. Both dogs get roughly 30 minutes of hard “play” morning and night, and are able to roam their respected areas of the barn.

Q: Do you have any issues with picky food issues, grooming, health problems or vetting concerns?

A: When the pups were around 7 months old, they each went through a picky phase. We had them on a chicken and rice flavored food and had to try a couple different flavors before we switched them to a salmon and rice flavor that they love. They would still eat the chicken and rice, but not eagerly and would leave food behind so we decided to make a change.

 

Q: What do you feed your dog(s)?

A:They are on a 50/50 mix of Purina Pro Plan large breed puppy (salmon and rice) and Purina ONE high protein +plus large breed puppy.

 

Q: How would you rate your Gampr? From extremely laid back (level 1) to very intense (level 10)

A: Jemma is between 3 and 4 and Chief is between 2 and 3.

 

Q: How does your Gampr react to unexpected strangers?

A: If we are not present or if they have not been properly introduced, they will bark until they are introduced or the stranger leaves.

Q: How does your Gampr react to guests you greet and allow on your property?

A: When greeted properly, the dogs pay visitors no mind. Chief will actually come over to get some attention from them while Jemma just goes back to doing what she was doing before.

 

Q: What is a typical day for your Gampr?

A: He goes outside to patrol the property around 4-6AM. Around 11 he gets sleepy and will come in and go out periodically while napping until around 4 PM. This sleepy time is when we work on a lot of training and occasionally go to visit the neighbors goats. In the evenings, he gets some energy and often plays with the neighbors dog who comes over. We will often go for walks in the neighborhood and sometimes elsewhere. Around 10-12 he will be brought in to sleep in the room with my husband and myself.

 

Q: What is your favorite trait, ability or feature about Gamprs?

A: How personable they are. They really are a special breed and form such a strong connection.

 

Q: Can you tell us an interesting story about your Gampr?

A: Our male despises bailer twine. If it isn’t properly disposed of in the trash bin, he will grab it and bring it to me and pester me until I throw it in the bin. Anyone that owns sheep knows how dumb they can be and twine seems to be their favorite thing to chew on. It’s a small detail Chief was able to pick up on from watching us when we feed but such a neat, helpful thing that he does.

 

Q: If you could give someone advice who may be on the fence of choosing a breed, what would you tell them?

A: As someone that was on the fence between breeds, I encourage you to do your research. See what your goals/ needs are for your future LGD and find a breed that can satisfy those things. Set yourself up for success by finding a reliable breeder that will be with your for the long run, making a good LGD doesn’t just happen overnight.

 

Q: What kind of advice would you give to a new Gampr puppy owner?

A: Be prepared to feed their monstrous appetites— HA! Seriously though, these dogs will give you their hearts, do your homework and help set them up to be successful. They are amazing animals and the only LGD breed we’ll ever use again!

Q: Why did you join the AGCA?

A: To help improve and support the breed. The added bonus in joining the club unbeknownst to us at the time was the support this club gives its members. The sense of community is second to none and you can see just how much the members love the breed. The Facebook group is a huge resource as well!

 

Amber Rogers, Oregon

Q: Do you have a farm, homestead? Explain your set up and what you do.

A: We have a small farm in Central Oregon.  Our property is near town but also out of town.  We raise meat sheep and dairy sheep, rabbits and poultry.  We do not have perimeter fencing but do have interior fencing.  The dogs are allowed to roam freely.  

 

Q: How many Gamprs do you own and what are their names?

A:  Currently we have 3 Gamprs.  Miera our female is 3yrs.  Melik is our 2.5yr old neutered male.  Grigor is our newest edition.  He is 6 mo old.

 

Q: Did your dog come from a breeder in the US/CA or did you import?

A: Our dogs were purchased from US based breeders

 

Q: Why did you choose your breeder?

A: Our first dog Miera “fell into our laps”  we met her dad and loved the breed instantly.  Her mother was one of the first imports and is well known.  The second dog was purchased out of desperation for more predator control.  He was unfortunately not bred well has been since neutered.   Our newest addition was carefully selected from a good ethical breeder.  

 

Q: Do you have a mentor? How important is this to you?

A: I do:  I believe that having a mentor is important for those times when you realize you have made a mistake and need some support and guidance or are lacking in knowledge, and needing help navigating information.

 

Q: What made you choose this breed?

A:  We met a male being transported up to another state to be bred.  We were instantly enamored of the breed.

 

Q: How important was the history and age of the Gampr when deciding on a breed? Were there any other factors that were considered prior to making your decision?

A:  It did not come into play for our first dog.  With our third dog, quality became a huge factor.  Good ethical breeder that is an ambassador for the breed was extremely important.  

 

Q: Can you tell us a bit about your dog(s)?

A:  Our female is the rockstar here…. We have yet to find a chink in her armor.  She is smart, discerning, gentle yet ferocious.  Our neutered male has been our red headed step child.  He is a testament to why getting an LGD from a quality ethical breeder is a MUST.  Gregor….. well, he is young and still learning but so far has earned gold stars all across the board.  

 

Q: What job(s) does your Gampr(s) have? If they are still in training, tell us about that.

A:  Our dogs wear many hats but mainly they protect the entire property as well as the livestock and humans with in the perimeter.  Our new pup is strictly going to be our sheep guardian.  He will spend his days guarding our small flock of meat sheep.  

 

Q: Does your Gampr make you feel that you and yours are safe? Explain

A: Definitely, they are a very intelligent discerning brave breed.  They do not wander so I never have to wonder if they are close at hand if something goes awry.

 

Q: How is your Gampr with children?

A:  All of them LOVE children

 

Q: Describe the bond you have with your dog(s). Can you also compare this to experience with other breeds?

A.  I have a different bond with each individual dog no matter the breed on our farm.  This is a difficult question because every dog is different and each has a special place in our hearts.

 

Q: How is your Gampr with other animals?

A:  They do not like strange animals, if it comes from the house…. they are fine.

 

Q: How would you rate your Gampr? From extremely laid back (level 1) to very intense (level 10)

A:  Depends….. working 11 just hanging out…..1

 

Q: How does your Gampr react to guests you greet and who are allowed on your property?

A:  Our female is great.  Our neutered male… not so much

 

Q: What is your favorite trait, ability or feature about Gamprs?

A:  Their flexibility to so whatever job is asked.

 

Q: If you could give someone advice who may be on the fence of choosing a breed, what would you tell them?

A: Keep to the breeds that are old and have not been messed with by human intervention a whole lot.  Look for dogs that are able to be flexible with changes.  A good dog that will not wander is invaluable.  I have always felt that if a dog sticks around, they are worth keeping.  If a dog wanders…. they are uninterested in you or their job and therefore need to move on.

 

Q: If you could give someone advice who is actively searching for a Gampr, what would you tell them?

A:  Good Quality Ethical breeder!!!

 

Q: What kind of advice would you give to a new Gampr puppy owner?

A:  Let the dog be a puppy, they have a life times worth of work to do when they grow up.

 

Q: Why did you join the AGCA?

A:  I want an association that cares about what happens to a breed.  One that shows support to breeders and buyers.  Ethical breeding and placing is the key to good dogs with long lasting homes.

 
 

Napolyon Isikbay, Oregon

Q: Do you have a farm, homestead? Explain your set up and what you do.

A: We have a 10 acre farm in Oregon. Currently we raise chickens for eggs. Previously had Katahdin sheep and few heads of beef cattle.

 

Q: How many Gamprs do you own and what are their names?

A: We own two Gamprs, both one year old. Their names are Archuk (Little bear) and Yeraz (Dream)

 

Q: Did your dog come from a breeder in the US/CA or did you import?

A: Archuk (Female) came from Tribble Hill Farm in Mississippi, and Yeraz (Male) is an import from Armenia.

 

Q: Why did you choose your breeder?

A: After extensive research, we were convinced that Heather Riley from THF, knew and cared extensively about the Gamprs. Her commitment to the breed as well as to the AGCA was simply extraordinary, which at the end convinced us that we are dealing with a reputable breeder who will not only sell you a pup but will stand by you in the years ahead.

 

Q: Do you have a mentor? How important is this to you?

A: At this point, we consider Heather as our mentor as well as our dear friend.

 

Q: What made you choose this breed?

A: Being Armenian, we naturally felt some cultural association and kinship to the breed. More importantly however, how well they perform as livestock guardian dogs. They are extremely bright and hardworking dogs on one hand will defend your livestock against the predators, while also being very affectionate family dogs who will not threaten people visiting our farm.  The other factor for us was also the fact that Gamprs are landrace breed and none of them look alike.

 

Q: How important was the history and age of the Gampr when deciding on a breed? Were there any other factors that were considered prior to making your decision?

A: We wanted to have two gampr pups, male and a female, about the same age so that they can play and grow up together.

 

Q: Can you tell us a bit about your dog(s)?

A: Archuk (Female) is relatively short haired and has different shades of brown and reddish color all over her body including her mask. She is extremely bright, very alert and very active dog. She loves to work the fence line, and occasionally would sit down and observe what might be moving at a distance. Yeraz (Male) who is an import from Armenia, has black, white & tan markings with a black mask. He has long hair. Yeraz is more laid back but still quite alert of surroundings. Yeraz does not wonder around as much and prefers to stay in his run next to the chickens.

 

Q: What job(s) does your Gampr(s) have? If they are still in training, tell us about that.

A: Both dogs are about a year old and currently being trained to guard our chickens.

 

Q: Does your Gampr make you feel that you and yours are safe? Explain

A: Totally! Though they both are quite affectionate, their alertness, their size and their deep barks makes us feel quite safe.   

 

Q: How is your Gampr with children?

A: As small pups, they have been great with the children.

 

Q: Describe the bond you have with your dog(s). Can you also compare this to experience with other breeds?

A. Both dogs are very submissive to us and would like to hang out with us if we are out in the field. They do however know that they have a job to do and will bolt at the indication of a smallest threat.

 

Q: How is your Gampr with other animals?

A: Yeraz does well with both of our cats and does not bother them too much. Archuk on the other hand likes to chase them away which we are working on correcting.

 

Q: How would you rate your Gampr? From extremely laid back (level 1) to very intense (level 10)

A: Archuk (8) / Yeraz (4)

 

Q: How does your Gampr react to guests you greet and who are allowed on your property?

A: They both are quite welcoming of the guests.

 

Q: What is your favorite trait, ability, or feature about Gamprs?

A: Highly intelligent and very affectionate!

 

Q: Can you tell us an interesting story about your Gampr?

A: Once realizing that there was a hawk hovering above the chickens, my wife started to make a barking sound and started pointing  to the sky. To our surprise, both dogs looked up and started barking at the hawk. We knew at that point that how smart and how attentive they are to what we do around them.

 

Q: If you could give someone advice who may be on the fence of choosing a breed, what would you tell them?

A: If you live on a farm and have a livestock that are vulnerable to the predators, don’t hesitate to get a Gampr from a reputable breeder.

 

Q: If you could give someone advice who is actively searching for a Gampr, what would you tell them?

A: First, I would advise them to leverage the valuable information on the AGCA website to educate themselves about the breed. Second, get your Gampr from reputable breeder whose focus are to protect the genetic makeup of the breed and also the dogs come from a working family.

 

Q: What kind of advice would you give to a new Gampr puppy owner?

A: Try to first bond with the pups for the first couple of weeks before introducing them to your livestock.  

 

Q: Why did you join the AGCA?

A: Best decision we have made. We were in need of getting couple of Gampr pups and the club provided guided us how best to do it.